Adopted and Filed

Reading endorsements, 13.28

Untitled document

ARC 2586C

EDUCATIONAL EXAMINERS BOARD[282]

Adopted and Filed

Pursuant to the authority of Iowa Code section 272.2(1)"a," the Board of Educational Examiners hereby amends Chapter 13, "Issuance of Teacher Licenses and Endorsements," Iowa Administrative Code.

Endorsement requirements are periodically reviewed to ensure alignment with research-based competencies, national standards, and the Iowa Core. The new subrules pertaining to reading endorsements reflect recommendations by a reading endorsement review committee, which met in October and continued to communicate electronically throughout the past few months and was comprised of current reading teachers, reading specialists, Department of Education and Reading Research Center consultants, and higher education faculty from a variety of Iowa institutions.

Notice of Intended Action was published in the Iowa Administrative Bulletin as ARC 2450C on March 16, 2016. A public hearing took place on April 6, 2016.

Four individuals from the organization Decoding Dyslexia attended and spoke at the public hearing. The Board also received numerous written comments advocating for more specific language related to dyslexia. Based on public comments and recent changes in Iowa Code section 256.16, more specific language has been added for clarity in the rules regarding dyslexia.

These amendments are subject to waiver pursuant to 282—Chapter 6.

The Board of Educational Examiners adopted these amendments on May 13, 2016.

After analysis and review of this rule making, there is no anticipated impact on jobs.

These amendments are intended to implement Iowa Code section 272.2(1)"a."

These amendments will become effective July 27, 2016.

The following amendments are adopted.

Item 1. Rescind subrule 13.28(15) and adopt the following new subrule in lieu thereof:

13.28(15) Reading. K-8 and 5-12. Completion of 24 semester hours in reading to include all of the following requirements:

a. Foundations of reading. This requirement includes the following competencies:

(1)The practitioner demonstrates knowledge of the psychological, sociocultural, motivational, and linguistic foundations of reading and writing processes and instruction.

(2)The practitioner demonstrates knowledge of a range of research pertaining to reading, writing, and learning, including the analysis of scientifically based reading research, and knowledge of histories of reading. The range of research encompasses research traditions from the fields of the social sciences and other paradigms appropriate for informing practice and also definitions of reading difficulties including but not limited to dyslexia.

(3)The practitioner demonstrates knowledge of the major components of reading, such as comprehension, vocabulary, word identification, fluency, phonics, and phonemic awareness, and effectively integrates curricular standards with student interests, motivation, and background knowledge.

b. Reading curriculum and instruction. This requirement includes the following competencies:

(1)The practitioner demonstrates knowledge of designing and implementing an integrated, comprehensive, and balanced curriculum that addresses the major components of reading and contains a wide range of texts, including but not limited to narrative, expository, and poetry, and including traditional print, digital, and online resources.

(2)The practitioner uses knowledge of a range of research-based strategies and instructional technology for designing and delivering effective instruction, including appropriate interventions, remediation, assistive technology, and classroom accommodations for students with dyslexia and other difficulties.

(3)The practitioner demonstrates knowledge of grouping students, selecting materials appropriate for learners with diverse abilities at various stages of reading and writing development, differentiating instruction to meet the unique needs of all learners, including students with dyslexia, offering sufficient opportunities for students to practice reading skills, and providing frequent and specific instructional feedback to guide students' learning.

(4)The practitioner demonstrates knowledge of designing instruction to meet the needs of diverse populations, including populations in urban, suburban, and rural settings, as well as for students from various cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

(5)The practitioner demonstrates knowledge of creating a literate physical environment which is low risk, supports students as agents of their own learning, and supports a positive socio-emotional impact for students to identify as readers.

c. Reading assessment, diagnosis and evaluation. This requirement includes the following competencies:

(1)The practitioner understands types of reading and writing assessments and their purposes, strengths, and limitations.

(2)The practitioner demonstrates knowledge of selecting and developing appropriate assessment instruments, procedures, and practices that range from individual to group and from formal to informal to alternative for the identification, screening, and diagnosis of all students' reading proficiencies and needs including knowledge of the signs and symptoms of dyslexia and other reading difficulties.

(3)The practitioner demonstrates knowledge of assessment data analysis to inform, plan, measure, progress monitor, and revise instruction for all students and to communicate the outcomes of ongoing assessments to all stakeholders.

(4)The practitioner demonstrates awareness of policies and procedures related to special programs, including Title I.

d. Reading in the content areas. This requirement includes the following competencies:

(1)The practitioner demonstrates knowledge of morphology and the etymology of words, along with text structure and the dimensions of content area vocabulary and comprehension, including literal, interpretive, critical, and evaluative.

(2)The practitioner demonstrates an understanding of reading theory, reading knowledge, and a variety of research-based strategies and approaches to provide effective literacy instruction into content areas.

(3)The practitioner demonstrates knowledge of integrating literacy instruction into content areas for all students, including but not limited to students with disabilities, students who are at risk of academic failure, students who have been identified as gifted and talented, students who have limited English language proficiency, and students with dyslexia, whether or not such students have been identified as children requiring special education under Iowa Code chapter 256B.

e. Language development. This requirement includes the following competency: The practitioner uses knowledge of oral language development, linguistics including phonology and phonological awareness, sound-symbol association, syllable types, morphology, syntax and semantics and the relationship of these components to typical and atypical reading development and reading instruction, cognitive academic language development, oral and written language proficiency (including second language development), acquisition of reading skills, and the variations related to cultural and linguistic diversity to provide effective instruction in reading and writing.

f. Oral communication instruction. This requirement includes the following competencies:

(1)The practitioner has knowledge of the unique needs and backgrounds of students with language differences and delays.

(2)The practitioner uses effective strategies for facilitating the learning of language for academic purposes by all learners.

g. Written communication instruction. This requirement includes the following competency: The practitioner uses knowledge of reading-writing-speaking connections; the writing process to include structures of language and grammar; the stages of spelling development; the different types of writing, such as narrative, expressive, persuasive, informational, and descriptive; and the connections between oral and written language development to effectively teach writing as communication.

h. Children's fiction and nonfiction (K-8 only) or adolescent or young adult fiction and nonfiction (5-12 only). This requirement includes the following competency: The practitioner uses knowledge of children's literature (K-8) or adolescent or young adult literature (5-12) for:

(1)Modeling the reading and writing of varied genres, including fiction and nonfiction; technology- and media-based information; and nonprint materials;

(2)Motivating through the use of texts at multiple levels, representing broad interests, and reflecting varied cultures, linguistic backgrounds, and perspectives; and

(3)Matching text complexities to the proficiencies and needs of readers.

i. Practicum. This requirement includes the following competencies:

(1)The practitioner works with appropriately licensed professionals who observe, evaluate, and provide feedback on the practitioner's knowledge, dispositions, and performance of the teaching of reading and writing.

(2)The practitioner effectively uses reading and writing strategies, materials, and assessments based upon appropriate reading and writing research and works with colleagues and families in the support of children's reading and writing development.

Item 2. Rescind subrule 13.28(16) and adopt the following new subrule in lieu thereof:

13.28(16) Reading specialist. K-12. The applicant must have met the requirements for the standard license and a K-8 or 5-12 reading endorsement and must present evidence of at least three years of experience which included the teaching of reading as a significant part of the responsibility.

a. Authorization. The holder of this endorsement is authorized to serve as a reading specialist in kindergarten and grades one through twelve.

b. Program requirements. Degree—master's.

c. Content. Completion of a sequence of courses and experiences which may have been a part of, or in addition to, the degree requirements. This sequence is to be at least 24 semester hours to include the following:

(1)Foundations of reading. The reading specialist will understand the historical, theoretical, and evidence-based foundations of reading and writing processes and instruction and will be able to interpret these findings to model exemplary instructional methods for students with typical and atypical literacy development and effectively develop and lead professional development.

(2)Curriculum and instruction. The reading specialist will use instructional approaches, materials, and an integrated, comprehensive, balanced curriculum to support student learning in reading and writing including the following:

1.Work collaboratively with teachers to develop a literacy curriculum that has vertical and horizontal alignment K-12 and that uses instructional approaches supported by literature and research for the following areas: print, phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, comprehension, vocabulary, writing, critical thinking, and motivation.

2.Support classroom teachers to implement and adapt in-depth instructional approaches, including but not limited to approaches to improve decoding, comprehension, and information retention, to meet the language-proficiency needs of English language learners and the needs of students with reading difficulties or reading disabilities, including appropriate interventions, remediation, assistive technology, and classroom accommodations for students with dyslexia and other difficulties within or outside the regular classroom.

3.Demonstrate a knowledge of a wide variety of quality traditional print, digital, and online resources and support classroom teachers in building and using a quality, accessible classroom library and materials collection that meets the specific needs and abilities of all learners.

4.Provide support for curriculum and instruction through modeling, coteaching, observing, planning, reviewing literacy data, and providing resources.

(3)Assessment, diagnosis, and evaluation. The reading specialist will use a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading and writing instruction including the following:

1.Demonstrate an understanding of the literature and research related to assessments and their purposes, including the strengths and limitations of assessments, and assessment tools for screening, diagnosis, progress monitoring, and measuring outcomes; demonstrate an understanding of the signs and symptoms of reading difficulties including but not limited to dyslexia; and also demonstrate an understanding of district and state assessments, proficiency standards and student benchmarks.

2.Select, administer, and interpret assessments for specific purposes, including collaboration with teachers in the analysis of data, and leading schoolwide or districtwide scale analyses to select assessment tools that provide a systemic framework for assessing reading, writing, and language growth of all students, including those with reading difficulties and reading disabilities including but not limited to students with dyslexia and English language learners.

3.Use assessment information to plan and evaluate instruction, including multiple data sources for analysis and instructional planning, for examining the effectiveness of specific intervention practices and students' responses to interventions including appropriate interventions, remediation, assistive technology, and classroom accommodations for students with dyslexia and other difficulties, and to plan professional development initiatives.

4.Communicate assessment results and implications to a variety of audiences.

(4)Administration and supervision of reading programs. The reading specialist will:

1.Demonstrate foundational knowledge of adult learning theories and related research about organizational change, professional development, and school culture.

2.Demonstrate the practical application of literacy leadership including planning, developing, supervising, and evaluating literacy programs at all levels.

3.Demonstrate knowledge of supervising an overall reading program, including but not limited to staffing; budgetary practices; planning, preparing, and selecting materials; subsystems; special provisions; and evaluating teacher performance.

4.Participate in, design, facilitate, lead, and evaluate effective and differentiated professional development programs to effectively implement literacy instruction.

5.Demonstrate an understanding of local, state, and national policies that affect reading and writing instruction.

6.Promote effective communication and collaboration among stakeholders, including parents and guardians, teachers, administrators, policymakers, and community members, and advocate for change when necessary to promote effective literacy instruction.

(5)Educational research, measurement and evaluation. The reading specialist will effectively utilize existing research and learn to conduct new research to continuously improve the design and implementation of a comprehensive reading system.

(6)Psychology of language and reading. The reading specialist will understand the highly complex processes by which children learn to speak, read, and write, including language acquisition, linguistics including phonology and phonological awareness, sound-symbol association, syllable types, morphology, syntax and semantics and the relationship of these components to typical and atypical reading development and reading instruction, ranges of individual differences, reading difficulties and reading disabilities, including but not limited to dyslexia, and the importance of the role of diversity in learning to read and write.

(7)Practicum in reading leadership. The reading specialist will participate in elementary and secondary practicum experiences with licensed teachers who are serving in leadership roles in the area of reading.

[Filed 5/25/16, effective 7/27/16]

[Published 6/22/16]

Editor's Note: For replacement pages for IAC, see IAC Supplement 6/22/16.

Educational Examiners Board


This Organization is a part of the Education Department

Official Document

  • Reading endorsements, 13.28
  • Published on 6/22/2016
  • 1958 Views
  • Adopted and Filed

The official published PDF of this document is available from the Iowa General Assembly’s Administrative Rules page.

View Official PDF

View the Iowa Administrative Bulletin for 6/22/2016.

View Bulletin

Related Notices

Administrative Rule References

The following administrative rule references were added to this document. You may click a reference to view related notices.

Rule 282-13.28(15) Rule 282-13.28(16)
Click To Comment